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Microbiome Importance

Everyone’s microbiome is unique, but there are a few generalities about what’s healthy and what’s not.🔍🤔

“In healthy people, there is a diverse array of organisms,” says Dr. Gail Hecht, chair of the American Gastroenterological Association Center for Gut Microbiome Research & Education. Most of those organisms are bacteria, but there are viruses, fungi, and other microbes as well.

“In an unhealthy individual, there’s much less diversity, and there seems to be an increase of bacteria we associate with disease.”

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Causes

Dr. Alison Vandekerkhove from A New Leaf Naturopathic Clinic explaining the common causes of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, also known as SIBO.

SIBO is caused when the bacteria from the large intestine can migrate into the small intestine or even into the stomach. This migration of the bacteria is what actually causes the issue. In our system, we have an MMC (migrating motor complex) which works like a dishwasher. After we’ve eaten the MMC rinses through our system to keep the bacteria at bay. Anything that causes the bacteria to move or the MMC to stop working properly can cause SIBO.

Common causes include general flu’s (with diarrhea and vomiting), chronic concussions, low stomach acid, and abdominal surgeries.

 

Gut Health

“All disease begins in the gut.” -Hippocrates

The health of your gastrointestinal system is extremely important to your overall well-being. Largely responsible for the critical functions of the body’s digestive and immune systems, beneficial bacteria in your digestive system have the capability of affecting your body’s vitamin and mineral absorbency, hormone regulation, digestion, vitamin production, immune response, and the ability to eliminate toxins, not to mention your overall mental health.

Digestion, mood, health, and even the way people think is being linked to their “second brain”, also known as their gut, more and more every day. The Enteric Nervous System (ENS) is what scientists are calling the 100 million or so nerve cells that line our gastrointestinal tracts. The main role of the ENS is to control digestion, and in doing so it also communicates back and forth with the brain as to the overall health of the body’s gut and immune system.

The connection between gut health and mood has been known for some time, as individuals suffering from bowel-disorders such as Celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or leaky gut are more likely than others to also suffer from autoimmune diseases and mental issues such as depression and anxiety. Symptoms related to poor gut health can be as obvious like headaches, fatigue, joint pain, and immune system weakness.

Most often, dysbiosis is the result of too many bad “bugs” including bacteria, yeast, and sometimes parasites, and not enough good ones. This imbalance causes damage to the mucosal layer of your GI tract; the normally smooth intact mucosal layer becomes permeable, allowing food proteins to enter into the blood stream. This consequently activates your immune system, causing inflammation, food sensitivities, and a myriad of symptoms both in the GI system and throughout the whole body.

Sourced from: Nava Center

Recurring SIBO? 5 Mistakes You May Be Making

Dealing with recurring SIBO? Here are 5 mistakes you might be overlooking.

  1. You’re stressed out – It’s no secret that mental and emotional stress have an impact on physical health. What’s fascinating is that stress can even affect the microbes living in your gut. For example, stress hormones can interfere with digestion, reducing stomach acid and inhibiting the wave-like motion of the intestines. The end result? Microbes that grow where they’re not supposed to. To make matters worse, stress is pro-inflammatory and weakens your immune system. This means that if you’re stressed out, your SIBO treatment might not be working. And chances are higher that you’re more likely to be faced with an infection, along with another round of antibiotics.
  2. You’re eating a bunch of processed carbs – You don’t have to stick to a rigid SIBO diet forever. But if your SIBO treatment isn’t working, or has stopped working, check in with your diet. Are you snacking on processed foods? Have refined carbs wiggled their way back into your diet?
  3. You’re not taking probiotics – With too many microbes in your small intestine, why would you even dream of taking more? Well, as nutritionist Angela Pifer explains, in most cases of SIBO, probiotics are not the sort to cause trouble. In fact, they’re the sort to do good things like: reduce inflammation, maintain a healthy gut pH, battle it out with the “bad guys”, and repopulate your colon with healthy tribes of microbes after antibiotic therapy.
  4. Your stomach acid needs some muscle – By muscle, we mean the very thing that enables your stomach acid to do its job – a low pH. If your stomach acid is too alkaline, it has a hard time breaking down food and killing stray, pathogenic bugs that might find their way into your gut. The problem with undigested food is that it’s fodder for microbes. And when microbes eat, they produce gas and painful cramps – ouch! Beef up your stomach acid and your SIBO treatment by: getting rid of any antacids you’re taking, chewing your food well, taking a moment to relax before sitting down to eat, and sipping on a glass of water with 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar before your meal – some folks swear by this!
  5. Your intestines are injured –  In the case of recurring SIBO, oftentimes the intestines have lost their ability to fully sweep away bacteria and food particles. Leaving said bacteria and food particles to ferment and grow in the small intestine. This sweeping motion is part of your migrating motor complex (MMC). You can help out your MMC and your current SIBO treatment by following these tips: avoid snacking or eating too often (this gives your intestines plenty of time to flush out food), get enough sleep – nighttime is when your MMC really shines, and take a supplement that stimulates movement.

 

Courtesy of: http://holisticsquid.com/sibo-treatment-hacks/