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Breath Test Check-In

Prepping for your Hydrogen and Methane breath test? Here are some friendly reminders to achieve the most accurate results and find your way onto recovery from Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth.

  • You must fast for 12 hours prior to the test. (Diabetic patients should consult with their provider prior to fasting to ensure this test is safe for them.)
  • Plan on doing the test on a morning that you can dedicate four hours to testing.
  • Do not insert your finger into the tube sampler — there is a sharp needle.
  • Some patients may experience SIBO- related symptoms after drinking the test solution. These symptoms may last for up to 24 hours.

2 weeks before your test – Finish taking any antibiotics or antifungals. Do not undergo colonoscopy or barium enemas during this time (regular home enemas like Fleet are okay.)

7 days before your test – Unless otherwise directed by your provider, please avoid Proton Pump Inhibitors.

4 days before your test – Avoid all laxatives including Vitamin C and Magnesium.

1-2 days before your test – Refrain from all high fiber and lactose-containing foods. These foods can ferment in your gut and potentially cause false results. If you have constipation, please refrain for the full two days.

The following list of food options are acceptable for the preparatory diet.

  • Baked or boiled chicken, fish or turkey
  • Plain, steamed white rice (If you are on a grain free diet, please do not consume rice)
  • Eggs
  • Clear meat broth (no bouillon, bone/cartilage or vegetable broth)
  • Fats/oils (ie: coconut/olive/vegetable oil, butter, lard)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Weak black coffee/tea (plain, no sweeteners or cream)

All About Eggs!

Eggs are a delicious and nutritious breakfast idea. If your diet doesn’t tolerate eggs, try egg whites and egg yolks separately. Some people don’t tolerate the egg protein in the egg white and some people don’t do well with the fat in the egg yolk. Testing each part separately means you can figure out what you tolerate and what you don’t, which might help you add a new food to your diet too! If you test both and still don’t feel like either is working for you, definitely keep them out and retest them again later. For those who tolerate eggs, they can be your best friend! ❤️🥚

Scrambled or fried eggs are an easy breakfast. For scrambled eggs, throw in some spinach (or other greens), leftover veggies, bacon or homemade sausage for extra nutrition and taste. Or make and freeze breakfast egg muffins in advance (there are tons of awesome, easy recipes on the internet for these.) You can also find pre-packaged hard boiled eggs at Costco or other grocery stores. Just make sure to review the ingredients to ensure there are no other spices or additives. Hard boiled eggs are great with a dollop of pesto, as tolerated.

What’s In Your Cup?

Coffee and Tea Tips for the low FODMAPer:

If you’d like to enjoy a cup of coffee or tea, we suggest limiting within your own personal tolerance levels. For most patients, this is about 1-2 cups per day. The recommended best practice is to spread out with 1 cup per sitting, and begin gauging your tolerance from there.

  • Low FODMAP tea options include:  Black tea, white, green, peppermint tea, rooibos, buchu, honeybush, chai tea (made weak), dandelion tea (made weak.)
  • High FODMAP tea to avoid while on the elimination diet: Fennel, chamomile, oolong.
  • Low FODMAP coffee options: : Espresso &  drip brewed coffee. If available, try using a French Press (different methods of preparation may impact the fibers in the brew – trial and error in preparation methods will help you find what works best for you!)

What to add to your tea or coffee?

  • Select from cows milk alternatives to use in your cup of coffee such as almond, rice, coconut or hemp milk.
  • Most (if not all) soy milk is high FODMAP, as it’s made with the whole soybean. The fiber in whole soybeans contain the FODMAPs. Finding soy milk made with only soy protein would be your best low FODMAP option.
  • You could also try ordering a cappuccino “very dry” – foam only.  If you find small amounts of lactose works for you, a dry cappuccino might work as the amount of milk in the final product is far less than in a latte.
  • Note: Many coffee shop serving size options are huge! Opt for the small or tall size to keep your caffeine intake in check.

Sourced from: http://blog.katescarlata.com/2017/02/06/whats-cup-tea-coffee-options-fodmaper/