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Low FODMAP Pumpkin & Carrot Risotto

This low FODMAP pumpkin and carrot risotto is delicious, not to mention gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, and soy-free! It combines fresh lemon flavors with the comfort of creamy rice and sweet roasted vegetables. This dish is great on its own or with pan-fried white fleshed fish.

Ingredients:

Roast Veggies

-240g pumpkin

-2 large carrots

-1 tbsp olive oil

-Salt and pepper to taste

Risotto

-1 1/2 cups medium grain risotto rice

-1/2 cup leek (green tips only)

-1 tbsp garlic-infused oil

-1 tbsp olive oil

-4 cups low FODMAP chicken (or vegetable) stock

-2 tsp lemon zest

-2 1/2 tbsp lemon juice

-4 cups spinach

-3 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped

-Optional: 50g Parmesan cheese (or a vegan cheese option)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400. Peel and chop the pumpkin and carrots into 1/2 inch sized pieces. Place in an oven dish, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 25 minutes (until soft and slightly golden.) Toss a couple of times while cooking.

While the veggies are roasting, make the risotto. Roughly chop the green leek tips. Make the stock if using stock cubes and shred the spinach. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat. Fry the leek tips in olive oil and garlic-infused oil for 2 minutes. Add the rice, stir through the mixture for about 1 minute.

Next, add 1/2 cup of stock at a time, stir every now and then until the liquid has absorbed into the rice. Continue to add and stir in the stock slowly. Turn down the heat to medium low if needed (if rice starts to stick to bottom of pan.) Once rice has absorbed about 3/4 of the stock, check to see if rice is cooked; should take about 20 minutes. Continue adding if not cooked. While the risotto cooks, zest the lemons.

While the rice finishes cooking, stir through the shredded spinach, lemon juice, and zest. Season with salt and pepper. Then stir through the roast veggies, chopped fresh cilantro, and grated cheese (if using.)

Serve the pumpkin and carrot risotto in bowls. Dig in!

Sourced from: https://alittlebityummy.com/recipe/en-ca/low-fodmap-pumpkin-carrot-risotto-3/

Mediterranean Zucchini Salad 🥗

Try this delicious Mediterranean-style zucchini salad with tomatoes, artichokes, olives, and parsley for dinner tonight! Add protein such as a chicken breast or grilled fish for the perfectly balanced, colorful meal.
Ingredients:

2 large zucchini
1 cup organic cherry tomatoes, halved 
1 can artichoke, dried & quartered
½ cup pitted and halved olives
Zest of 1 organic lemon
3 tbsp garlic-infused oil
3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
Salt & pepper to taste
2 tbsp fresh minced parsley
1 cup crumbled feta cheese, aged 30 days (optional)

Instructions:

Wash the zucchini and peel if desired. Using a spiralizer, process the zucchini into noodles and add to a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, artichoke hearts and olives. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the lemon zest, juice, oil and vinegar. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with crumbled feta cheese (if desired) and parsley and serve! 😋

SIBO Friendly Recipe: Low FODMAP Breakfast Sausages

Low FODMAP Breakfast Sausages😋
Ingredients:
1 pound ground organic chicken, turkey or pork
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon garlic-infused oil 
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
1 teaspoon paprika
Instructions:
Combine all ingredients in a bowl and blend with hands until well mixed. Form small patties and set aside. Heat a frying pan on medium. Place patties in the pan and fry for approximately 4-6 minutes per side or until crispy and golden on the outside and cooked through. Enjoy! 🌭

Low FODMAP Lemon Herb Chicken with Garden Vegetables

Ingredients:

  • 2 zucchini, chopped into thick slices
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 yellow pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup carrots, chopped
  • 3 cups of mini potatoes, chopped in halves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 boneless & skinless chicken breasts
  • 1 tbsp dried basil
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • ⅛ tsp salt
  • ⅛ tsp pepper
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 lemon

Instructions:

  1. Chop up the first 5 vegetables as directed.
  2. Heat coconut oil in a frying pan, on medium.
  3. Place potatoes and carrots in frying pan for 10 minutes.
  4. Lower heat to medium-low and add zucchini and peppers. Cover and cook for 20 more minutes stirring frequently.
  5. While vegetables are cooking, cook chicken in a separate frying pan until cooked through and no longer pink.
  6. Assemble herb sauce by mixing basil, oregano, salt, pepper and olive oil in a small bowl.
  7. Drizzle herb sauce over top of chickens and squeeze ¼ of a lemon over each chicken breast.
  8. Serve chicken on a bed of vegetables.
  9. Garnish with freshly chopped parsley, if desired. Yum!

Recipe sourced from: https://ignitenutrition.ca/blog/low-fodmap-lemon-herb-chicken/

Living On The Brighter Side

Living with gut problems such as Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth can wreak havoc on our stress levels and mental health. Even though it can be difficult, it’s important to stay optimistic and try to live on the bright side of life. Ask any successful person to divulge the secret to winning, to meeting and exceeding goals, to feeling fulfilled and accomplished, and they’ll usually say that optimism is key. Optimism is what helps us deal with unexpected change, crushing stress, and inevitable disappointments. It’s what prompts us to learn from mistakes rather than feel defeated by them. Optimism doesn’t just make us feel happier, it also makes us more confident. Optimism helps us believe in ourselves and our ability to bring about a solution. We’re sharing ways to cultivate optimism and confidence into your own daily life.

  1. Focus on solutions, not on problems – If you find yourself obsessing about a problem, feeling negative, or experiencing self-doubt, change your focus by asking, “What’s one thing I could do differently that might make this situation better?” Replacing problem-focused thinking with solution-focused thinking immediately gives you a sense of forward movement, possibility, and hope — the foundations of optimism.
  2. Play a 30-second “movie” of your life daily – Create an imaginary movie reel of your ideal life, including specific details about how you look, how you feel, where you live, what you’re doing, what you’ve accomplished, and what your life is like. Set aside 30 seconds every day to play this movie in your mind. Set an alarm on your phone to remind you to do it. This simple mental training exercise will instantly boost your mood and transform the way you think about yourself, your potential, and your future.
  3. Find any improvement to the current situation – One way to practice optimism, be more positive in your thinking, and orient yourself toward success is to get into the habit of looking for any improvement in the current situation as a solution, no matter how small. For example, losing a half pound may seem small when your goal is 50 pounds, but it’s still movement in the right direction.
  4. Minimize obstacles to success – What kinds of distractions or obstacles routinely get in the way of meeting your goals? Is it your to-do list? Unproductive habits? Negative people or sabotagers? One of the keys to achieving optimism is to make steady progress, and that means limiting distractions. Figure out ways to avoid temptations in your life so you don’t deplete your reserve of discipline before getting priorities done. If you waste time on the internet, then don’t go online. If you have difficulty saying, “I’m busy” to friends, let their calls go to voicemail. Succeeding rather than failing keeps you optimistic!
  5. Conjure up an inner coach – Many of us are more confident and perform better when someone is cheering us on. Yet a part of being a successful person is being self-aware and accountable to oneself. One way to reinforce these traits is to conjure up a coach in your mind. Recall a role model who inspired and challenged you. When faced with a daunting task, ask yourself, “What would So-and-So do if she had two reports and only 24 hours to complete them?”
  6. Give yourself daily “done wells” – Get in the habit of recognizing “done wells.” Take a few moments every day to ask the question, “What have I done well today?” This simple gesture reinforces optimism on a daily basis. The answers accumulate and eventually help you develop self-confidence, which is extremely important for success.
  7. Nurture a happy body – A happy body helps you generate happy thoughts and emotions. Optimism is easier when you feel good. Factors that interfere with one’s ability to moderate a good mood and positive energy include: lack of sleep, depleted energy from poor eating and lifestyle habits, and too little exercise. If you have a big goal to achieve, “train” for it like a professional athlete. For optimal mental focus and performance, take a holistic approach to physical and mental health—sleep, rest, manage your stress, have a good diet, and get plenty of vigorous exercise.

Sourced from: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7949/7-ways-to-become-a-more-optimistic-person.html