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Low FODMAP Pumpkin & Carrot Risotto

This low FODMAP pumpkin and carrot risotto is delicious, not to mention gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, and soy-free! It combines fresh lemon flavors with the comfort of creamy rice and sweet roasted vegetables. This dish is great on its own or with pan-fried white fleshed fish.

Ingredients:

Roast Veggies

-240g pumpkin

-2 large carrots

-1 tbsp olive oil

-Salt and pepper to taste

Risotto

-1 1/2 cups medium grain risotto rice

-1/2 cup leek (green tips only)

-1 tbsp garlic-infused oil

-1 tbsp olive oil

-4 cups low FODMAP chicken (or vegetable) stock

-2 tsp lemon zest

-2 1/2 tbsp lemon juice

-4 cups spinach

-3 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped

-Optional: 50g Parmesan cheese (or a vegan cheese option)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400. Peel and chop the pumpkin and carrots into 1/2 inch sized pieces. Place in an oven dish, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 25 minutes (until soft and slightly golden.) Toss a couple of times while cooking.

While the veggies are roasting, make the risotto. Roughly chop the green leek tips. Make the stock if using stock cubes and shred the spinach. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat. Fry the leek tips in olive oil and garlic-infused oil for 2 minutes. Add the rice, stir through the mixture for about 1 minute.

Next, add 1/2 cup of stock at a time, stir every now and then until the liquid has absorbed into the rice. Continue to add and stir in the stock slowly. Turn down the heat to medium low if needed (if rice starts to stick to bottom of pan.) Once rice has absorbed about 3/4 of the stock, check to see if rice is cooked; should take about 20 minutes. Continue adding if not cooked. While the risotto cooks, zest the lemons.

While the rice finishes cooking, stir through the shredded spinach, lemon juice, and zest. Season with salt and pepper. Then stir through the roast veggies, chopped fresh cilantro, and grated cheese (if using.)

Serve the pumpkin and carrot risotto in bowls. Dig in!

Sourced from: https://alittlebityummy.com/recipe/en-ca/low-fodmap-pumpkin-carrot-risotto-3/

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Symptoms

Dr. Alison Vandekerkhove from A New Leaf Naturopathic Clinic explaining the symptoms of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (also known as SIBO.)

Some of the common symptoms include bloating (flat stomach in the morning, as you eat throughout the day it gets more and more bloated), constipation, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and anemia’s (it’s hard to digest B12, iron, etc. and your body isn’t properly absorbing the nutrients.)

Up to 80% of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is thought to be caused by SIBO.

Digestive Health & The 4 R’s

Figure out exactly what is going on within your body with advanced diagnostic testing, such as Allergy Testing and the Hydrogen Methane Breath Test, to determine which food sensitivities you may have and how intense your Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth is. These sensitivities could also be affecting your body’s ability to absorb and digest nutrients. Talk to your naturopathic physician regarding which supplements could benefit your body, and keep your gut healthy for the long-term. Your naturopathic doctor can also help you create a nutrition plan that matches your lifestyle and individual health needs. It’s important that they understand and utilize the “4 R’s” of gastrointestinal and digestive health – Remove, Repair, Restore, and Replace.

Sourced from: Nava Center

SIBO Canada YouTube Channel

Visit our YouTube Channel for monthly videos surrounding Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth. These videos include SIBO Causes, Symptoms, and Testing.

Subscribe to our channel to stay up to date with the latest content and information regarding SIBO.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2vk11Em_7gJGZB2Gp0kXag

Gut Health

“All disease begins in the gut.” -Hippocrates

The health of your gastrointestinal system is extremely important to your overall well-being. Largely responsible for the critical functions of the body’s digestive and immune systems, beneficial bacteria in your digestive system have the capability of affecting your body’s vitamin and mineral absorbency, hormone regulation, digestion, vitamin production, immune response, and the ability to eliminate toxins, not to mention your overall mental health.

Digestion, mood, health, and even the way people think is being linked to their “second brain”, also known as their gut, more and more every day. The Enteric Nervous System (ENS) is what scientists are calling the 100 million or so nerve cells that line our gastrointestinal tracts. The main role of the ENS is to control digestion, and in doing so it also communicates back and forth with the brain as to the overall health of the body’s gut and immune system.

The connection between gut health and mood has been known for some time, as individuals suffering from bowel-disorders such as Celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or leaky gut are more likely than others to also suffer from autoimmune diseases and mental issues such as depression and anxiety. Symptoms related to poor gut health can be as obvious like headaches, fatigue, joint pain, and immune system weakness.

Most often, dysbiosis is the result of too many bad “bugs” including bacteria, yeast, and sometimes parasites, and not enough good ones. This imbalance causes damage to the mucosal layer of your GI tract; the normally smooth intact mucosal layer becomes permeable, allowing food proteins to enter into the blood stream. This consequently activates your immune system, causing inflammation, food sensitivities, and a myriad of symptoms both in the GI system and throughout the whole body.

Sourced from: Nava Center