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SIBO-Friendly Meal Ideas

We’re sharing our top picks for simple and nutritional meals that won’t upset a SIBO-Friendly Diet.

  1. A grilled chicken breast with 1/2 cup steamed broccoli, topped with butter, salt, and pepper
  2. Mixed green salad with tomatoes, cucumber, 2 tablespoons of sunflower seeds, and aged Parmesan cheese, drizzled with garlic-infused olive oil
  3. 3/4 cup butternut squash noodles cooked with butter, salt, pepper, grated aged cheddar cheese, and crispy bacon bits
  4. Bacon-stuffed chicken breast with a side of kale salad
  5. Pan-fried pork chops with a side of green beans (approximately 10 green beans is low FODMAP approved)
  6. Homemade beef meatballs in a simple tomato sauce
  7. Shrimp cooked in garlic-infused olive oil over a bed of zucchini noodles, topped with aged Parmesan cheese
  8. Breakfast for dinner – cheesy eggs and bacon (make sure the cheese is aged)
  9. Baked salmon with steamed vegetables
  10. Homemade beef stew with chunks of tender beef, tomatoes, and grilled vegetables

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Testing

Dr. Alison Vandekerkhove from A New Leaf Naturopathic Clinic🌿 covering the different types of testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, also known as SIBO.

Coconut Crumbed Prawns with Grapefruit Salad

Our ultimate SIBO-friendly Christmas menu includes these delicious (and healthy!) Coconut Crumbed Prawns with Ruby Grapefruit Salad. Yum!

Ingredients:

  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup shredded coconut
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 12 king/jumbo prawns (or shrimp), shelled and deveined
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • 4 handfuls watercress, washed
  • 2 ruby grapefruit, cut into segments
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Break the egg into a bowl and beat until combined. Place the coconut and salt on a plate and mix thoroughly. Dip the prawns/shrimp in the egg, shake off excess, then dip in the coconut. Place on a clean plate. Repeat until all prawns/shrimp are covered. Melt the coconut oil in a deep frying pan over medium-high heat. To test if the oil has come to temperature, dip a corner of a prawn in the oil. If it sizzles, it is ready. Cook the prawns in the oil until cooked through on both sides. Remove and drain on paper towel. Place the watercress and grapefruit in a large bowl. In a small bowl, mix the olive oil and white wine vinegar together. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the dressing onto the salad and mix thoroughly. To serve, divide the salad and grapefruit segments over four plates. Top with three prawns/shrimp on each plate.

Sourced from: https://www.thehealthygut.com/recipes/coconut-crumbed-prawns-with-a-ruby-grapefruit-salad/

Mind Your Meal Times

Your gut is an incredible machine. It uses its muscular design to sweep food through the machinery of digestion, absorption and excretion. However, you probably didn’t realize that the machine has a self-cleaning cycle called the migrating motor complex (MMC). These rhythmic waves of contraction are designed to sweep away any digestive leftovers, and they are also thought to help control the growth of bacteria in the small intestine.

In order to optimize the migrating motor complex (MMC), you need to adequately space your meal times because these waves occur post absorption. While it varies between individuals, the migrating motor complex will occur typically 90 minutes post digestion and absorption. This is big news for a nation of constant snackers. If you are eating every 1-2 hours, you are less likely to access that self-cleaning cycle. A smarter approach? Do your best to space your eating opportunities four hours apart and try not to eat before bedtime.

Referenced from: Bio-K Community

Living On The Brighter Side

Living with gut problems such as Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth can wreak havoc on our stress levels and mental health. Even though it can be difficult, it’s important to stay optimistic and try to live on the bright side of life. Ask any successful person to divulge the secret to winning, to meeting and exceeding goals, to feeling fulfilled and accomplished, and they’ll usually say that optimism is key. Optimism is what helps us deal with unexpected change, crushing stress, and inevitable disappointments. It’s what prompts us to learn from mistakes rather than feel defeated by them. Optimism doesn’t just make us feel happier, it also makes us more confident. Optimism helps us believe in ourselves and our ability to bring about a solution. We’re sharing ways to cultivate optimism and confidence into your own daily life.

  1. Focus on solutions, not on problems – If you find yourself obsessing about a problem, feeling negative, or experiencing self-doubt, change your focus by asking, “What’s one thing I could do differently that might make this situation better?” Replacing problem-focused thinking with solution-focused thinking immediately gives you a sense of forward movement, possibility, and hope — the foundations of optimism.
  2. Play a 30-second “movie” of your life daily – Create an imaginary movie reel of your ideal life, including specific details about how you look, how you feel, where you live, what you’re doing, what you’ve accomplished, and what your life is like. Set aside 30 seconds every day to play this movie in your mind. Set an alarm on your phone to remind you to do it. This simple mental training exercise will instantly boost your mood and transform the way you think about yourself, your potential, and your future.
  3. Find any improvement to the current situation – One way to practice optimism, be more positive in your thinking, and orient yourself toward success is to get into the habit of looking for any improvement in the current situation as a solution, no matter how small. For example, losing a half pound may seem small when your goal is 50 pounds, but it’s still movement in the right direction.
  4. Minimize obstacles to success – What kinds of distractions or obstacles routinely get in the way of meeting your goals? Is it your to-do list? Unproductive habits? Negative people or sabotagers? One of the keys to achieving optimism is to make steady progress, and that means limiting distractions. Figure out ways to avoid temptations in your life so you don’t deplete your reserve of discipline before getting priorities done. If you waste time on the internet, then don’t go online. If you have difficulty saying, “I’m busy” to friends, let their calls go to voicemail. Succeeding rather than failing keeps you optimistic!
  5. Conjure up an inner coach – Many of us are more confident and perform better when someone is cheering us on. Yet a part of being a successful person is being self-aware and accountable to oneself. One way to reinforce these traits is to conjure up a coach in your mind. Recall a role model who inspired and challenged you. When faced with a daunting task, ask yourself, “What would So-and-So do if she had two reports and only 24 hours to complete them?”
  6. Give yourself daily “done wells” – Get in the habit of recognizing “done wells.” Take a few moments every day to ask the question, “What have I done well today?” This simple gesture reinforces optimism on a daily basis. The answers accumulate and eventually help you develop self-confidence, which is extremely important for success.
  7. Nurture a happy body – A happy body helps you generate happy thoughts and emotions. Optimism is easier when you feel good. Factors that interfere with one’s ability to moderate a good mood and positive energy include: lack of sleep, depleted energy from poor eating and lifestyle habits, and too little exercise. If you have a big goal to achieve, “train” for it like a professional athlete. For optimal mental focus and performance, take a holistic approach to physical and mental health—sleep, rest, manage your stress, have a good diet, and get plenty of vigorous exercise.

Sourced from: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7949/7-ways-to-become-a-more-optimistic-person.html